The Silver Atlantic

Photographic circulations in the 19th and 20th centuries – International Symposium

Jeu de Paume Museum, Paris, March 19-20, 2020

A symposium organized by the Theory and History of Modern Arts and Literatures Center (THALIM), the Cultural History of Contemporary Societies Center (CHCSC), the Languages Arts and Music Synergies Center (SLAM) and the Jeu de Paume Museum, in conjunction with the National Research Agency project Transatlantic Cultures.

CFP The Silver Atlantic

Spanish version below

CDP El atlántico de plata

French version below

AAC Atlantique Argentique

English version

CFP The Silver Atlantic

In 2007, a special issue of Etudes Photographiques entitled “Paris – New York” traced some of the countless, crisscrossing exchanges of pictures, ideas and technologies between two historical capitals of photography. These “zigzags” redirected conventional, linear accounts of the way a supposedly French-born technology was gradually taken over, in the course of the 20thcentury, by the United States’ rising economic, ideological and media dominance. This ostensible “cultural transfer” (Espagne 2013) turned out to be rather a continuous dialogue between Europe and North America: “the density of transatlantic exchanges [confirmed] that photography and its institutionalization reflect an Atlantic history” (Brunet et al., 2007, 3).

As is well-known, the story of photography’s beginnings has given rise to competing claims, rooted in diverging national narratives. Photography was imagined, envisioned, even possibly invented before Daguerre by Englishmen (among whom Henry Talbot), a Spaniard from Zaragoza (Ramos Zapetti) and perhaps even by another Frenchman exiled in Brazil (Hercules Florence). What François Brunet labeled “the idea of photography” (Brunet 2000) seems to have emerged almost simultaneously all around the shores of the Atlantic: “the desire to photograph appears as a regular discourse at a particular time and place—in Europe or its colonies during the two or three decades around 1800” (Batchen, 16).

The “Silver Atlantic” conference ambitions precisely to follow the zigzags cutting across the region, before the visual culture of the end of the 20th century was fundamentally transformed and globalized by digital technology and the apparent dematerialization of images. The construction of Atlantic cultures was partly played out in the way this “desire to photograph” crossed the Atlantic. Circulating pictures and publications, travelling professional and amateur practitioners, the international market for equipment and the organization of exhibitions all contributed to substantial commercial and cultural exchanges.

These crossings first reached major Atlantic capitals and harbors. They linked migrants’ homelands to the frontiers of exile (Kroes 2007, 34-53), mission fields and battlefields, tourism hotspots and mysterious horizons. To do so, photographs traveled by ship, cable, plane, and even inside a famous Mexican suitcase (Young 2010). Travels and correspondence, artistic circulations, institutional and cultural exchanges helped maintain kinships, invent friendships, foster political or religious networks throughout the region, nourishing common narratives across the ocean. The image Atlantic materialized both connection and distance, community and separation. It gave shape to empires, fed both propaganda and trade, and even invented a utopian “Family of Man” in the aftermath of the World War II (Stimson 2006, 87).

Papers presented in this conference should therefore focus on the contribution of photographs to the Atlantic visualscape (Schneider 2013, 36), the “image world” evoked by Deborah Poole to describe the visual economy linking the Andes, Africa, Europe and the United States (Poole 1997, 7).

 

We invite submissions on topics including, but not limited to:

  • The material circulation of pictures and publications
  • Circulations of actors (photographers, gallery owners, agents…), ideas (theories, books, translations…) and practices (forms, genres…)
  • Circulation of technology
  • Commercial and institutional exchanges (agencies, museums, exhibitions, publishing houses, companies, etc.)

This symposium is part of the international research project “Transatlantic Cultures”. Launched in 2015 by the Cultural History of Contemporary Societies Center (Paris-Saclay), the University Sorbonne-Nouvelle Paris 3 and the University of São Paulo, this project gathers a team of 40 researchers from 19 universities in Europe, Africa and the Americas. It will produce a Digital Platform for Transatlantic Cultural Historyedited in four languages (English, French, Spanish and Portuguese) whose aim is to analyze the cultural dynamics of the Atlantic Area and its central role in the contemporary process of globalization. Additional information:  https://tracs.hypotheses.org/

 

References

 Batchen, Geoffrey. 2001. Each wild idea: writing, photography, history. Cambridge, Mass: MIT Press.

Brunet, François. 2000. La naissance de l’idée de photographie. Paris : Presses Universitaires de France.

Brunet, François, Gaëlle Morel and Nathalie Boulouch. 2007. “Zigzags.” Etudes Photographiques, 21 (December): 2-5.

Espagne, Michel. « La notion de transfert culturel. » Revue Sciences/Lettres1 | 2013 (May 2012). https//doi.org/ 10.4000/rsl.219

Geary, Christaud M. 2007. « Mondes virtuels : les représentations des peuples d’Afrique de l’ouest par les cartes postales, 1895-1935 ». Le temps des médias 1 (8): 75-104.

Kea, Pamela. 2017. “Photography, care and the visual economy of Gambian transatlantic kinship relations.” Journal of Material Culture, 22 (1): 51-71.

Kossoy, Boris. 2003. Fotografia & Historía. São Paulo: Atelié editorial.

Kroes, Rob. 2007. Photographic Memories. Private Pictures, Public Images, and American History. Hanover, New Hampshire: Dartmouth College Press.

Poole, Deborah. 1997. Vision, Race and Modernity: A Visual Economy of the Andean Image World,Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press.

Schneider, Jürg. 2013. “Portrait Photography: A Visual Currency in the Atlantic Visualscape.” In Portraiture and Photography in Africa, edited by John M. Peffer and Elisabeth Lynn Cameron. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.

Stimson, Blake. 2006. The Pivot of the World: Photography and Its Nation. Cambridge, MA and London: The MIT Press.

Young, Cynthia. 2010. The Mexican suitcase. The rediscovered Spanish Civil War negatives of Capa, Chim, and Taro. Göttingen: Steidl, New York: International Center of Photography.

 

Additional information:

20-minute papers will be presented in French or English.

Deadline for sending proposals: 15 June 2019

Email: silveratlantic2020@gmail.com

Proposal format: abstract in English (no more than 1,500 characters), ten references and a biography (500 characters).

Notification of acceptance: 15 September 2019

Papers will be expected by February 1st, 2020

 

 

Organizing committee

Ada Ackerman, THALIM, National Center for Scientific Research

Didier Aubert, THALIM, Sorbonne Nouvelle – Paris 3 University

Clara Bouveresse, SLAM, Evry-Val d’Essonne University

Anaïs Fléchet, CHCSC, Versailles Saint-Quentin University

Eduardo Morettin,  São Paulo University

Priscilla Pilatowsky, High Institute for Latin American studies, Colegio de México

 

Scientific committee

Alexander Alberro, Columbia University, USA

Jennifer Bajorek, Hampshire College, USA

Alberto del Castillo Troncoso, Instituto Mora, Mexico

Paul-Henri Giraud, Lille University, France

Patricia Hayes, University of the Western Cape, South Africa

Jean Kempf, Lyon 2 Louis Lumière University, France

Boris Kossoy, São Paulo University, Brazil

Olivier Lugon, Lausanne University, Switzerland

Rebeca Monroy Nasr, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, México

Maureen Murphy, Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne University, France

Michel Poivert, Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne University, France

Shelley Rice, New York University, USA

Pia Viewing, Jeu de Paume, France

Laura Wexler, Yale University, USA

Kelley Wilder, De Montfort University, United-Kingdom

 

Spanish version

CDP El atlántico de plata

Convocatoria de ponencias

El atlántico de plata

Circulaciones fotográficas, siglos XIX-XX

Jeu de Paume, París, Francia
19-20 Marzo 2020

 

Coloquio internacional organizado por la UMR Théorie et histoire des arts et des littératures de la modernité  (THALIM), el Centre d’histoire culturelle des sociétés contemporaines (CHCSC), el laboratorio Synergies Langues Arts Musique  (SLAM), y el Jeu de Paume Museo, dentro del programa ANR Transatlantic Cultures

 

En 2007, un número especial de Etudes Photographiques titulado « Paris – Nueva York » describía los « zigzags » trazados por los incesantes intercambios de imágenes, de ideas y tecnologías entre las dos capitales históricas de la fotografía. Para entonces, se trataba de sacudir el relato lineal de una tecnología que nació francesa y que en el curso del siglo XX terminó acaparada por el poder mediático, comercial e ideológico norteamericano. Este transfert cultural (Espagne 2013) era en realidad una forma de diálogo interrumpido entre Europa y Estados Unidos. Así, la “densidad de intercambios transatlánticos confirma que la fotografía y su institucionalización son el reflejo de una historia atlántica”. (Brunet et.al. 2007, 3).

Como se sabe, la cuestión de los orígenes ha producido hipótesis encontradas, arraigadas en particularismos y reivindicaciones nacionales. La fotografía ha sido imaginada, esbozada, incluso inventada antes de Daguerre, por los ingleses (empezando por Henry Talbot), por un español de Zaragoza (Ramos Zapetti) y quizá por otro francés exiliado en Brasil (Hercules Florence). La “idea de la fotografía” (Brunet 2000) parece haber surgido al mismo tiempo en todas las orillas del Atlántico: “the desire to photograph appeared as a regular discourse at a particular time and place—in Europe or its colonies during the two or three decades around 1800 “ (Batchen 2001, 16).

El objetivo del coloquio « El atlántico de plata » será, justamente, esbozar una cartografía de estos “zigzags” en el conjunto de la región, previo a que la cultura visual de fines del siglo XX fuera transformada y mundializada por la tecnología digital y por la aparente desmaterialización de las imágenes. La construcción de culturas atlánticas se llevó a cabo, en parte, en la manera en que el “deseo de fotografiar” atravesó el Atlántico. La circulación material de imágenes y publicaciones, de profesionales y amateurs, el mercado de materiales y la organización de exposiciones fueron vectores importantes de los intercambios comerciales y culturales.

Estos cruces alcanzaron las grandes capitales del Atlántico y sus puertos. Ellos conectaron las patrias de origen de los migrantes y las fronteras del exilio  (Kroes 2007, 34-53), los campos de misión y los campos de batalla, las grandes zonas turísticas y los horizontes desconocidos. Para eso, las fotografías viajaron por barco, cable, avión, incluso en una maleta mexicana (Young 2010). Son por lo tanto los viajes y las correspondencias, los intercambios institucionales, los circuitos del arte y de la cultura, que contribuyeron a fabricar o mantener los lazos familiares, de amistad, políticos y religiosos en el conjunto de la región, alimentando las historias comunes de una orilla a otra.

Este « atlántico de imágenes » materializó a la vez el vínculo y el alejamiento, la comunidad y la separación. Moldeó imperios, nutrió la propaganda y el comercio, incluso elaboró la utopía de una « familia humana » común al terminar la segunda guerra mundial (Stimson 2006, 87). Las ponencias deberán ilustrar la contribución de las imágenes fotográficas al paisaje visual atlántico (Schneider 2013, 36), este “mundo imagen” (image world) evocado por Deborah Poole para describir la economía visual que conecta a los Andes, África, Europa y Estados Unidos (Poole 1997, 7).

 

Las líneas de trabajo siguientes pueden ser tratadas (lista no exhaustiva):

  • Las circulaciones materiales des las imágenes y las publicaciones.
  • Circulaciones de actores (fotógrafos, galeristas, agentes), discursos (teorías, obras, traducciones) y prácticas (formas, géneros).
  • La circulación de tecnologías.
  • Los intercambios comerciales e institucionales (agencias, museos, exposiciones, casas de edición, empresas, etc.).

 

Este coloquio se inscribe en el programa de investigación internacional “Transatlantic Cultures”. Puesto en marcha en 2015 por el Centre d’histoire culturelle des sociétés contemporaines (Paris-Saclay), la Universidad Sorbonne-Nouvelle Paris 3 y la Universidad de São Paulo, este proyecto reúne un equipo de 40 investigadores de 19 universidades en Europa, África y las Américas. Su objetivo es realizar un Diccionario de historia cultural transatlántica (siglos XVIII-XIX), editado en línea y en cuatro idiomas (francés, inglés, español, portugués) : una plataforma digital para analizar las dinámicas del espacio atlántico y comprender su papel en el proceso de mundialización cultural contemporáneo. Para saber más : https://tracs.hypotheses.org/

 

Bibliografía selecta

Batchen, Geoffrey. 2001. Each wild idea: writing, photography, history. Cambridge, Mass: MIT Press.

Brunet, François. 2000. La naissance de l’idée de photographie. Paris : Presses Universitaires de France.

Brunet, François, Gaëlle Morel y Nathalie Boulouch. 2007. “Zigzags.” Etudes Photographiques, 21 (December): 2-5.

Espagne, Michel. « La notion de transfert culturel. » Revue Sciences/Lettres 1 | 2013 (Mayo 2012). https//doi.org/ 10.4000/rsl.219

Geary, Christaud M. 2007. « Mondes virtuels : les représentations des peuples d’Afrique de l’ouest par les cartes postales, 1895-1935 ». Le temps des médias 1 (8): 75-104.

Kea, Pamela. 2017. “Photography, care and the visual economy of Gambian transatlantic kinship relations.” Journal of Material Culture, 22 (1): 51-71.

Kossoy, Boris. 2003. Fotografia & Historía. São Paulo: Atelié editorial.

Kroes, Rob. 2007. Photographic Memories. Private Pictures, Public Images, and American History. Hanover, New Hampshire: Dartmouth College Press.

Poole, Deborah. 1997. Vision, Race and Modernity: A Visual Economy of the Andean Image World, Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press.

Schneider, Jürg. 2013. “Portrait Photography: A Visual Currency in the Atlantic Visualscape.” In Portraiture and Photography in Africa, edited by John M. Peffer and Elisabeth Lynn Cameron. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.

Stimson, Blake. 2006. The Pivot of the World: Photography and Its Nation. Cambridge, MA and London: The MIT Press. 

Young, Cynthia. 2010. The Mexican suitcase. The rediscovered Spanish Civil War negatives of Capa, Chim, and Taro. Göttingen: Steidl, New York: International Center of Photography.

 

Informaciones prácticas

Las ponencias, de 20 minutos de duración, podrán ser en francés o en inglés.

Fecha límite de envío de propuestas (silveratlantic2020@gmail.com) : 15 de junio de 2019.

Formato de las propuestas (en inglés) : 1500 caracteres máximo, 10 referencias bibliográficas y una biografía (500 caracteres máximo).

Notificación de resultados : 15 de septiembre de 2019.

Envío de textos de las ponencias : 1 de febrero de 2000.

 

Comité de organización

Ada Ackerman, THALIM, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique

Didier Aubert, THALIM, Université Paris 3 Sorbonne Nouvelle

Clara Bouveresse, SLAM, Université d’Evry-Val d’Essonne

Anaïs Fléchet, CHCSC, Université de Versailles Saint-Quentin

Priscilla Pilatowsky, IHEAL-CREDA, Université Paris 3 Sorbonne Nouvelle

 

Comité científico

Alexander Alberro, Columbia University, Estados Unidos

Jennifer Bajorek, Hampshire College, Estados Unidos

Alberto del Castillo Troncoso, Instituto Mora, México

Paul-Henri Giraud, Université de Lille, Francia

Patricia Hayes, University of the Western Cape, Sudáfrica

Jean Kempf, Université Lyon 2 Louis Lumière, Francia

Boris Kossoy,  São Paulo University, Brasil

Olivier Lugon, Université de Lausanne, Suiza

Rebeca Monroy Nasr, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, México

Maureen Murphy, Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne, Francia

Michel Poivert, Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne, Francia

Shelley Rice, New York University, Estados Unidos

Pia Viewing, Jeu de Paume, Francia

Laura Wexler, Yale University, Estados Unidos

Kelley Wilder, De Montfort University, Reino-Unido

 

French version

AAC Atlantique Argentique

Appel à communications

Atlantique Argentique

 Circulations photographiques, XIX-XX e siècles

Musée du Jeu de Paume, Paris
19-20 Mars 2020

 

Colloque international organisé par l’UMR Théorie et histoire des arts et des littératures de la modernité (THALIM), le Centre d’histoire culturelle des sociétés contemporaines (CHCSC), le laboratoire Synergies Langues Arts Musique (SLAM) et le musée du Jeu de Paume dans le cadre du programme ANR Transatlantic Cultures

 

En 2007, un numéro thématique d’Etudes Photographiques intitulé « Paris – New York » décrivait les « zigzags » tracés par les échanges incessants d’images, d’idées et de technologies entre deux capitales historiques de la photographie. Il s’agissait alors de bousculer le récit trop linéaire d’une technologie née « française » et accaparée au cours du XXe siècle par la puissance médiatique, commerciale et idéologique nord-américaine. Ce « transfert culturel » (Espagne 2013) était en réalité une forme de dialogue ininterrompu entre l’Europe et les Etats-Unis. Ainsi, « la densité des échanges transatlantiques [confirmait-elle] que la photographie et son institutionnalisation sont le reflet d’une histoire atlantique. » (Brunet et al. 2007, 3). 

On le sait, la question des origines a donné lieu à des hypothèses concurrentes, ancrées dans les particularismes et les revendications nationales. La photographie a été imaginée, esquissée, voire inventée avant Daguerre, par des Anglais (au premier rang desquels Henry Talbot), par un Espagnol de Saragosse (Ramos Zapetti) et peut-être même par un autre Français exilé au Brésil (Hercules Florence). « L’idée de photographie » (Brunet 2000) semble avoir surgi presque en même temps sur toutes les rives de l’Atlantique : « the desire to photograph appeared as a regular discourse at a particular time and place—in Europe or its colonies during the two or three decades around 1800. » (Batchen 2001, 16).

L’objet du colloque « Atlantique argentique » sera donc d’esquisser une cartographie de ces « zigzags » dans l’ensemble de la région, avant que la culture visuelle de la fin du XXe siècle ne soit profondément transformée et mondialisée par la technologie numérique et l’apparente dématérialisation des images.  La construction de cultures atlantiques s’est jouée en partie dans la manière dont ce « désir de photographier » a traversé l’Atlantique. La circulation matérielle des images et des publications, des praticiens professionnels et amateurs, le marché des matériels et l’organisation d’expositions ont été des vecteurs importants d’échanges commerciaux et culturels. 

Ces traversées ont d’abord touché les grandes capitales de l’Atlantique et les ports. Elles ont relié les patries d’origines des migrants et les frontières de l’exil  (Kroes 2007, 34-53), les champs de missions et les champs de bataille, les hauts-lieux du tourisme et les horizons inconnus. Pour ce faire, les photographies ont voyagé par bateau, par câble, par avion, et même dans une célèbre valise mexicaine (Young 2010). Ce sont donc les voyages et les correspondances, les échanges institutionnels, les circuits de l’art et de la culture qui ont ainsi contribué à fabriquer ou à maintenir des liens familiaux, amicaux, politiques ou religieux dans l’ensemble de la région, nourrissant les histoires communes d’un rivage à l’autre.

Cet Atlantique des images matérialise  à la fois le lien et l’éloignement, la communauté et la séparation. Il a façonné des empires, nourri la propagande et le commerce, et même élaboré l’utopie d’une « famille humaine » commune au lendemain de la Seconde guerre mondiale (Stimson 2006, 87). Les interventions s’attacheront donc à dessiner la contribution des images photographiques au paysage visuel atlantique (Schneider 2013, 36), ce « monde image » (image world) évoqué par  Deborah Poole pour décrire l’économie visuelle liant les Andes, l’Afrique, l’Europe et les Etats-Unis (Poole 1997, 7).

Les pistes de travail suivantes pourront être abordées (liste non exhaustive) :

  • Les circulations matérielles des images et des publications
  • Les circulations des acteurs (photographes, galeristes, agents…), des discours (théories, ouvrages, traductions…) et des pratiques (formes, genres…)
  • Les circulations des technologies
  • Les échanges commerciaux et institutionnels (agences, musées, expositions, maisons d’édition, entreprises, etc.)

 

Ce colloque s’inscrit dans le cadre du programme de recherche international “Transatlantic Cultures”. Lancé en 2015 par le Centre d’histoire culturelle des sociétés contemporaines (Paris-Saclay), l’Université Sorbonne-Nouvelle Paris 3 et l’Université de São Paulo, ce projet rassemble aujourd’hui une équipe de 40 chercheurs, rattachés à 19 universités, en Europe, en Afrique et dans les Amériques. Il vise à la réalisation d’un Dictionnaire d’histoire culturelle transatlantique (xviiie-xxie siècles) édité en ligne et en quatre langues (français, anglais, espagnol, portugais) : une plateforme numérique pour analyser les dynamiques de l’espace atlantique et comprendre son rôle dans le processus de mondialisation culturelle contemporain. Pour en savoir plus: https://tracs.hypotheses.org/

 

Bibliographie sélective

Batchen, Geoffrey. 2001. Each wild idea: writing, photography, history. Cambridge, Mass: MIT Press.

Brunet, François. 2000. La naissance de l’idée de photographie. Paris : Presses Universitaires de France.

Brunet, François, Gaëlle Morel and Nathalie Boulouch. 2007. “Zigzags.” Etudes Photographiques, 21 (December): 2-5.

Espagne, Michel. « La notion de transfert culturel. » Revue Sciences/Lettres 1 | 2013 (May 2012). https//doi.org/ 10.4000/rsl.219

Geary, Christaud M. 2007. « Mondes virtuels : les représentations des peuples d’Afrique de l’ouest par les cartes postales, 1895-1935 ». Le temps des médias 1 (8): 75-104.

Kea, Pamela. 2017. “Photography, care and the visual economy of Gambian transatlantic kinship relations.” Journal of Material Culture, 22 (1): 51-71.

Kossoy, Boris. 2003. Fotografia & Historía. São Paulo: Atelié editorial.

Kroes, Rob. 2007. Photographic Memories. Private Pictures, Public Images, and American History. Hanover, New Hampshire: Dartmouth College Press.

Poole, Deborah. 1997. Vision, Race and Modernity: A Visual Economy of the Andean Image World, Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press.

Schneider, Jürg. 2013. “Portrait Photography: A Visual Currency in the Atlantic Visualscape.” In Portraiture and Photography in Africa, edited by John M. Peffer and Elisabeth Lynn Cameron. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.

Stimson, Blake. 2006. The Pivot of the World: Photography and Its Nation. Cambridge, MA and London: The MIT Press. 

Young, Cynthia. 2010. The Mexican suitcase. The rediscovered Spanish Civil War negatives of Capa, Chim, and Taro. Göttingen: Steidl, New York: International Center of Photography.

 

Informations pratiques

Les communications, d’une durée de 20 minutes, pourront se faire en français ou en anglais.

Date limite d’envoi des propositions : 15 juin 2019

Email : silveratlantic2020@gmail.com

Format des propositions : 1500 signes maximum, dix références bibliographiques et une biographie (500 signes maximum), en anglais

Notification d’acceptation des propositions : 15 septembre 2019

Remise des textes des interventions : 1er février 2020 , publication envisageable sur la plateforme Transatlantic Cultures

 

Comité d’organisation 

Ada Ackerman, THALIM, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique

Didier Aubert,  THALIM, Université Paris 3 Sorbonne Nouvelle

Clara Bouveresse, SLAM, Université d’Evry-Val d’Essonne

Anaïs Fléchet, CHCSC, Université de Versailles Saint-Quentin

Eduardo Morettin, Université de  São Paulo

Priscilla Pilatowsky, Institut des Hautes Etudes de l’Amérique Latine, Colegio de México

 

Comité scientifique

Alexander Alberro, Columbia University, Etats-Unis

Jennifer Bajorek, Hampshire College, Etats-Unis

Alberto del Castillo Troncoso, Instituto Mora, Mexique

Paul-Henri Giraud, Université de Lille, France

Patricia Hayes, Université du Cap-Occidental, Afrique du Sud

Jean Kempf, Université Lyon 2 Louis Lumière, France

Boris Kossoy, Université de São Paulo, Brésil

Olivier Lugon, Université de Lausanne, Suisse

Rebeca Monroy Nasr, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexique

Maureen Murphy, Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne, France

Michel Poivert, Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne, France

Shelley Rice, New York University, Etats-Unis

Pia Viewing, Jeu de Paume, France

Laura Wexler, Yale University, Etats-Unis

Kelley Wilder, De Montfort University, Royaume-Uni

 

 


Auteur : Aurélia Desplain

Ingénieure de recherche chargée de valorisation scientifique pour les laboratoires CHCSC (EA 2448) et DYPAC (EA 2449) à l'Université de Versailles Saint-Quentin en Yvelines. Chercheuse associée au laboratoire LAM (UMR 5115), membre du bureau des jeunes chercheur·e·s du GIS Asie.

Laisser un commentaire

Votre adresse de messagerie ne sera pas publiée. Les champs obligatoires sont indiqués avec *

Ce site utilise Akismet pour réduire les indésirables. En savoir plus sur comment les données de vos commentaires sont utilisées.